Dating and marriage in elizabethan times

Women were regarded as second class citizens and they were expected to tie the knot despite of their social standings. With parent's consent, a boy and a girl were allowed to marry at the age of 14 and 12 although it was not common for marriage to take place on such a young age.Boy would often not marry until they reached the age of consent, 21.As a woman, you had absolutely no say in your future husband, and were expected to accept whatever wise decision your parents (father) made for you.If you came from a noble family, you could expect some of your family’s assets to be pledged in the marriage as well, a custom known as a dowry.—————————— Jennifer Mc Gowan’s Maid of Secrets debuts May 7, 2013, from Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers.She is currently at work on book 2 in the series, Maid of Deception.However, people in the lower class would normally go for arranged marriages with the children of friends and neighbors.Thus, the lower the status a family holds in the society then the larger power a person may have in choosing life partners.

In Meg’s book, MAID OF SECRETS, Meg is absolutely determined not to marry.

Courtship, the very concept was derived from the Elizabethan era where the ladies of the court were wooed and won by knights and lords of the court through gestures such as of frequent visits, gifts and compliments.

The man generally asked a woman's father for permission to court his daughter, that implied that the man was seriously and openly desiring the responsibility of marriage.

Mostly, these were arranged marriages keeping wealth and reputation into consideration.

Families of landowners were expected to marry just to attain land possession.

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